Success Stories

Since 1956, Global Impact has raised more than $1.7 billion to help the world’s most vulnerable people. Each day we work with our charity partners to fight poverty, heal the sick and support communities in need, meeting real needs with real results. Below, please find a sample of success stories from the Global Impact Charity Alliance.

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE MISSION: Mamtha's Story

Mamtha’s dreams were simple—the sweet musings of any 10-year-old girl around the world. But her life was unlike many other girls her age: She had no friends and no time to draw. She was not allowed to attend school or even play.

INTERNATIONAL AIDS VACCINE INITIATIVE: Understanding and Empowering Marginalised Groups

MSM Community Center in India

Critical to bringing the world an AIDS vaccine is understanding and empowering marginalized groups who bear the brunt of HIV/AIDS: women and girls, men who have sex with men, mobile communities, young people. IAVI and our partners foster many critical bridges between researchers and the communities in which they work.

INTERNATIONAL AIDS VACCINE INITIATIVE: Understanding and Empowering Marginalised Groups

MSM Community Center in India

Critical to bringing the world an AIDS vaccine is understanding and empowering marginalized groups who bear the brunt of HIV/AIDS: women and girls, men who have sex with men, mobile communities, young people. IAVI and our partners foster many critical bridges between researchers and the communities in which they work.

INTERNATIONAL AIDS VACCINE INITIATIVE: Preventing and Controlling HIV Infection

HVSP Engineer

HIV mutates faster than most other viruses, escapes the immune system’s responses and hides, waiting to emerge and strike at any time. A vaccine will likely need to elicit bNAbs and broadly effective “killer” T cells to help prevent and control infection. IAVI and partners continued to isolate new bNAbs and to design new immunogens and screen them in animals. Two were selected and advanced toward clinical evaluation.

HIAS: El Salvadorian Sister Reunited with Parents

Volunteers witnessed the family being reunited.

The biggest difference between North Carolina and El Salvador? “It’s safer here. You can walk around at night,” Vanessa says. The 19-year-old has been in the U.S. for only a few months, but the words fly out almost immediately. “It was such a drastic change… I felt safe right away here.”

“The food is different here, too,” her younger sister, Xenia, chimes in. “The flavors are different. Even the salad is different.” She says that American-style salad is her new favorite food.

HIAS: Slow Motion Crisis- Chad's Forgotton Refugees

A woman collect rations for her family of eleven to last a month.

With more than 60 million people displaced worldwide, global relief efforts and public attention have been stretched thin. The world, it seems, can focus only on so many refugees – and only for so long.

But just because a region doesn’t make the headlines doesn’t mean the needs there aren’t dire. In fact, lack of attention can make it harder for refugees to get the assistance they need. The world moves on, and aid agencies turn their attention to the next crisis, not because the others have been solved but simply because there is no one else to put out these new fires.

HELEN KELLER INTERNATIONAL: Growing Crops and Confidence in Tanzania

Revina Francis is a young single mother living in a small fishing village on Ukerewe Island in northwest Tanzania. She proudly maintains a plot of vitamin A-rich orange sweet potatoes, spinach and other leafy green vegetables. But it hasn’t always been easy.

Just three years ago, she found herself unable to complete secondary school after becoming pregnant. Abandoned by her child’s father, Revina had few options as a young woman in a culture where respect comes with age.

HELEN KELLER INTERNATIONAL: Harlem Students Get New Glasses Through ChildSight

Two girls show off their new glasses.

P.S. 129 in Harlem serves a proud, but economically challenged community. 92% of the students qualify for free or reduced price lunches, a strong indicator that the majority of the children there are living at or below the poverty line.

Janyia is one of those students. A bright, confident 8th grade girl, she had been living without the use of her prescription glasses for several months.

“I lost them a while back,” she explained. “Glasses cost a lot and to get them with the insurance, you have to wait a long time.”

ASHOKA: Malala Yousafzai- 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient

Before becoming a global advocate for equal access to education for girls, Malala Yousafzai worked closely at Ashoka Fellow Mohammad Ali’s school, Khpal Kor in Swat, Pakistan. This school provided Malala and other girls like her access to education where the opportunities for education were extremely limited. Malala was Speaker of the “District Child Assembly” that Mohamad started to give children a voice. This gave Malala the opportunity to hone her changemaking skills at an early age.

ASHOKA: Kailash Satyarthi- 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient

Kailash Satyarthi is the renowned leader in the global movement against child labor. He was elected to the Ashoka Fellowship in 1993. In 1983, Kailash Satyarthi founded the grassroots movement Bachpan Bachao Andolan - Save the Childhood Movement and Rugmark - a rug trademarking organization that guaranteed fair practices and no child labor. These movements have rescued over 80,000 children from the scourge of bondage, trafficking and exploitative labor in the last three decades.

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