Success Stories

Since 1956, Global Impact has raised more than $1.7 billion to help the world’s most vulnerable people. Each day we work with our charity partners to fight poverty, heal the sick and support communities in need, meeting real needs with real results. Below, please find a sample of success stories from the Global Impact Charity Alliance.

WORLDWIDE FISTULA FUND: From Despair to Triumph

Irene is able to go about daily activities after her surgery.

Healthy, happy and employed today, Irene’s situation was once much worse with fistula.

At age 13, Irene was pregnant and alone. Her parents were deceased and her boyfriend left after discovering her pregnancy. When Irene went in to labor, a friend helped her to two separate clinics that could not assist her. Irene was finally taken to the hospital after falling unconscious, but it was too late.

WORLDWIDE FISTULA FUND: Margaret Lived with Fistula for 26 Years...

Margaret sits with her child after her surgery.

Margaret suffered alone with fistula for 26 years. Her husband left because he could no longer stand her condition. There are 140,000 to 200,000 women living with fistula in Uganda with 2,000 new women develop fistula each year. The average Ugandan woman with fistula suffers for 10 years before receiving treatment.

WORLD RENEW: Babies Thrive Thanks to Good Nutrition

A mother monitors the growth of her child.

World Renew strives to improve the health of babies by targeting their nutrition in the first 1,000 days of life (from conception to their second birthday). Lack of proper care during this time places a child at risk of stunted growth, disease, and even death. It can also impact a child’s development, health, and income-potential for the rest of his or her life.

WORLD RENEW: Less Can Mean More for Hungry Families

A farmer stands in a field of maize.

In central Kenya, most farming families have only half an acre of land on which they must produce enough food to eat year-round.

On his half acre, Paul Kamau tries to grow enough to feed five children, his wife, and himself. Kamau and his family live in the Kiganjo community, where most families are dependent on agriculture and where the increasing population has forced families to farm on smaller plots of land.

WORLD BICYCLE RELIEF: Ethel's Dream

Every day Ethel rides her bicycle to school.

Every day, 15-year-old Ethel, would have to wake before the sun to finish her morning chores. This included chopping wood, fetching containers of water and washing clothes. She would come home late and not have the time or energy to study and complete homework. Before she owned a Buffalo Bicycle, she had to walk over two hours across hilly terrain every day to attend school. Before the Buffalo Bicycle, she would arrive at school already tired and would struggle to focus, though she loves science and wanted to learn. Her commute now takes 45 minutes.

WORLD BICYCLE RELIEF: Mary is on the Move

Mary rides her bike on the way to school.

Mary came to the Palabana Children’s Village in 2004 when she was just seven years old. Mary’s father had passed away and her mother, who is HIV positive, was no longer able to care for her. She had grown up in poverty and arrived malnourished, small, and withdrawn. She was struggling to see her future.

VARIETY: Twins Require 24 Hour Medical Assistance

In early 2015, we were contacted by a mother who sought our assistance. Kate is mum to twins Francis and Maeve. Both twins live with many different medical issues that require 24 hour assistance.

VARIETY: Kiwi Kids Program Brings Joy to a Family Devestated by an Earthquake

Solo mother Cherie and her three children used to live in Christchurch, but after a series of earthquakes devastated the city in 2011 they were effectively left homeless.

Five year old Dhanika, her eight year old sister Kharma, and younger brother Matauranga lost most of their personal possessions and the family’s furniture and appliances were destroyed along with their home.

VARIETY: Meet Delany

Renovating a home helps rebuild the life of a child

Variety, the Children’s Charity and the Renovators Council of the Manitoba Home Builders Association use all the tools in their toolbox to help rebuild a child’s life.

Pages